Posts tagged structure
Creative Workshop at Sourcebits

Inspired by the Marshmallow Challenge Ben and I organized a creative thinking workshop for the lively crowd at Sourcefest, a two-day hackathon for the employees of Sourcebits. The aim of the session was to get people excited and energetic, and of course get their creative juices flowing. Instead of using marshmallows and spaghetti, I sourced waste foam material and straws. The idea of wasting so much food just didn't make sense [especially in India]. 45 people attended the session. Rules were pretty simple, use only straws and foam cubes, no glue/sticky tape is allowed, and the tallest structure wins. And the tricky part - the tallest point of the standing structure has to be a piece of foam.

Very rewarding to see everyone have so much fun and make crazy structures. Here are some pictures from one hour session.

Research: its Aims and Structure
research_notes.jpg

Phil Jones spoke about his thesis 'The Bones of the Book:  Schematic Structure and Meanings made from from Books' and it lead me to question my Study Plan immediately. It is only a synopsis right now, but in time I should be confident of where my research stands in the academic world. These are some pointers from Phil on how to structure your research, in my own words: > The Subject This is the underlying aim, drive or motivation behind my work.

> The Field What is the state of interactive media today? What is the most current research and art in this field, and how and in which direction is it moving towards. What are the factions etc.

> Research Question Specifying the focus of the study using relevant technical terms from my discipline, in a question format. Aim, Objectives (Detailed aim) will flow from the research question.

> Theoretical Context World view, philosophical point of view, which will then influence your practice, awareness.

> Methods Connected to your theoretical framework.

> Claims and Truths Provably true, probably true (statistics) or plausibly true (convincing argument)

> Prediction of the form of the final presentation